Upper Saucon Township

Upper Saucon Township is a township in Lehigh County, Pennsylvania

Welcome to Upper Saucon Township

Upper Saucon Township is situated in the southeastern corner of Lehigh County approximately 60 miles north of Philadelphia and 80 miles east of Harrisburg. Upper Saucon has been a bedroom community for the Lehigh Valley region including the cities of Allentown, Bethlehem and Easton. It’s convenient location with easy access to PA Route 309, Interstate 78 and US Route 22 have made Upper Saucon a very attractive place to live for those wanting both a somewhat rural atmosphere.

Upper Saucon Township

Upper Saucon Township is a township in Lehigh County, Pennsylvania, in the United States. It is a suburb of Allentown, Pennsylvania, in the Lehigh Valley region of the state.

History

Originally, this area was populated by the Unami division of the Lenape native people (also called the Delaware people). The name Saucon comes from the native word, Saukunk, meaning 'mouth of the creek', that being the location of a Lenape village.

History

Established in 1743, Upper Saucon was originally part of Bucks County, one of the three initial counties established by William Penn in 1682. In 1752, Northampton County was carved off of Bucks County and encompassed Upper Saucon. Later, in 1812, Lehigh County was carved from Northampton thus Upper Saucon became part of Lehigh County.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township has a total area of 24.7 square miles (64.0 km2), of which, 24.7 square miles (63.9 km2) of it is land and 0.04 square miles (0.1 km2) of it (0.12%) is water. Its boundary with Salisbury Township is located on South Mountain.[5] Elevations range from approximately 500 feet in Spring Valley to over 1,000 feet at Bauer's Rock in Big Rock County Park.

Geography

Upper Saucon is in the Delaware watershed and is drained by the Saucon Creek into the Lehigh River, except for a very small area in the extreme south just SW of Locust Valley, which is drained by the Unami Creek into the Perkiomen Creek and Schuylkill River.

Geography

Upper Saucon Township has a hot-summer humid continental climate (Dfa) and is in hardiness zone 6b. The average monthly temperature in Center Valley ranges from 28.9 °F in January to 73.5 °F in July.

Notable Villages

Center Valley Colesville (also in Lower Saucon Township, Northampton County) Friedensville Lanark Limeport (also in Lower Milford Township) Locust Valley Spring Valley Summit Lawn (also in Salisbury Township)

Education

DeSales University, Penn State Lehigh Valley, and Strayer University-Allentown campus are institutions of higher education located in the township.

Education

Along with the borough of Coopersburg and Lower Milford Township, Upper Saucon is served by the Southern Lehigh School District. Southern Lehigh High School serves grades nine through twelve.

Saucon Source Facebook page

SauconSource.com is an independently owned news website covering the greater Saucon Valley area, including Hellertown and Lower Saucon Township, Pa.

Upper Saucon Township

Indians were the first inhabitants of the area known today as Upper Saucon Township. The word “Saucon” is derived from the Indian word “Suakunk” which was the name applied to an Indian village at the mouth of Saucon Creek, and afterwards a large tract of land lying on both sides the creek from its source to its mouth. Suakunk comes from the Indian word Sa-ku-wit, meaning the mouth of a creek.

Upper Saucon Township

The Village of Center Valley formed the principle gathering spot for the Township and evolved as a linear community initially focused around the intersection of present day Routes 309 and 378. By 1848, the village consisted of only a general store, hotel and a 60-acre farm. Construction of the North Pennsylvania Railroad through the Township in 1856 brought improved transportation and expanded access to urban markets.

Upper Saucon Township

The Center Valley Station became an important shipping point for agricultural products from surrounding farms. The community around the station was at one point locally known as “Milk Town” because of the large quantity of milk that was shipped out of the area. According to the Bucks County Historical Society, two and one half million gallons of milk were shipped annually to the Philadelphia area via the railroad.

Upper Saucon Township

In addition to the agricultural trade, the Township’s other key industry was mining. The Friendensville Zinc Mine is the only registered historical site in the Township and dates back to 1845. The mining of zinc ore first occurred on the farm of Jacob Ueberroth, which was eventually purchased by the Lehigh Zinc Company and was the largest of the many mines in the local area. Between 1869 and 1872, the Lehigh Zinc Company installed the world famous Cornish pump known as “The President”.

Upper Saucon Township

This pump was used to remove between 12,000 to 16,000 gallons of water a minute from the mines. The Lehigh Zinc Company was eventually acquired by the New Jersey Zinc Company and the property is currently owned by the Stabler Land Company.

Home of The Promenade Shops at Saucon Valley

The Promenade Shops at Saucon Valley is a shopping mall in the Lehigh Valley region of Pennsylvania, in the United States. It is located near the Stabler Center near Center Valley

Home of The Promenade Shops at Saucon Valley

The Promenade Shops at Saucon Valley is a shopping mall in the Lehigh Valley region of Pennsylvania, in the United States. It is located near the Stabler Center near Center Valley

Upper Saucon Township

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Upper Saucon Township

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Upper Saucon Township

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Neighborhood Report

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School Report

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Calendar Events & Meetings

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School District Information

Upper Saucon School District

Available Homes in Upper Saucon Township

Demographics
As of the census[7] of 2000, there were 11,939 people, 3,970 households, and 3,283 families residing in the township. The population density was 483.9 people per square mile (186.9/km2). There were 4,117 housing units at an average density of 166.9/sq mi (64.4/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 97.11% White, 0.70% African American, 0.06% Native American, 1.13% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.40% from other races, and 0.59% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.07% of the population.

There were 3,970 households, out of which 37.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 74.2% were married couples living together, 5.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 17.3% were non-families. 13.6% of all households were made up of individuals, and 5.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.79 and the average family size was 3.07.

In the township the population was spread out, with 24.0% under the age of 18, 11.1% from 18 to 24, 26.1% from 25 to 44, 27.2% from 45 to 64, and 11.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females, there were 99.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.1 males.

The median income for a household in the township was $66,703, and the median income for a family was $73,381. Males had a median income of $50,041 versus $30,165 for females. The per capita income for the township was $27,606. About 0.9% of families and 1.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.6% of those under age 18 and 3.1% of those age 65 or over.

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